Article

Exercises of Clauses | Clauses Exercises with Answers

 

Table of Contents

My contact number

English Grammar  – Clauses exercises Exercises with Answers

 

Exercises on ClausesClauses are the basic units of English grammar. They are the fundamental building blocks of sentences in English. They’re essentially mini-sentences themselves, with two key ingredients – the subject and the verb. This article provides exercises on clauses and imparts the types of clauses. Students can strengthen their language communication skills by getting a grasp on the clauses topic of English grammar.

My contact number

 

 

My contact number

 

Parts of a Clause

  • Subject: This is the “who” or “what” of the clause, the noun or pronoun that performs the action or exists in the state described.
  • Verb: This is the “action word” that tells what the subject is doing or being. It needs to be in a finite form, meaning it conveys a complete idea of time.

 

My contact number

Clauses can be Dependent or Independent. 

  • Independent clauses: These can stand alone as complete sentences and express a complete thought. Example: “The sun shines brightly.”
  • Dependent clauses: These cannot stand alone and rely on an independent clause for explanation. Example: “While the sun shines brightly,” (incomplete thought)

Definition 

“ a group of words that includes a subject and a verb, and forms a sentence or part of a sentence”

-Oxford Dictionary

“a group of words, consisting of a subject and a finite form of a verb.”

-Cambridge Dictionary

 

“a group of words containing a subject and predicate and functioning as a member of a complex or compound sentence.”

-Merriam Webster Dictionary

Types of Clauses

 

 Based on their function, clauses can be further categorized as:

  • Independent or Main clauses: These form the core of a sentence and contain the main idea. They are always independent clauses.

Example:

    1. The cat chased the mouse. (Complete thought, single clause sentence.)
    2. He smiled, but she kept walking. (Two independent clauses connected by “but”.)

 

  • Dependent or Subordinate clauses: These provide additional information or qualify the main clause. They are always dependent clauses.

Example:

    1. Since it was raining, we cancelled the picnic. (Dependent clause “Since it was raining” explains why the picnic was cancelled.)
    2. The book that I gave you is on the table. (Dependent clause “that I gave you” modifies the noun “book”.)

 

  • Noun clauses: These act like nouns within a sentence. Example: “She told me that she would be late.”

Example:

    1. I told him that I would be late. (Noun clause “that I would be late” serves as the object of the verb “told.”)
    2. The question is whether she will come. (Noun clause “whether she will come” serves as the subject of the sentence.)

 

  • Relative or Adjective clauses: These modify nouns or pronouns. Example: “The book that I borrowed is fascinating.”

Example:

    1. The woman who smiled at me is my neighbor. (Adjective clause “who smiled at me” modifies the noun “woman”.)
    2. The house where they lived is haunted. (Adjective clause “where they lived” modifies the noun “house”.)

 

  • Adverbial clauses: These modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs. Example: “He left before the rain came.”

Example:

    1. He left before the rain came. (Adverbial clause “before the rain came” modifies the verb “left”.)
    2. I felt happy although I was tired. (Adverbial clause “although I was tired” modifies the adjective “happy”.)
  1.  

    Exercise 1- Identify the Clauses. (Some sentences may have more than one clause.)

     

    1. The world is a beautiful place, full of wonder and discovery.

    Ans. The world is a beautiful place – Independent clause

     

    1. The dog that won the competition received a giant trophy.

    Ans. The dog that won the competition – Adjective clause

    received a giant trophy – Independent clause

     

    1. I can’t go swimming today because the water is too cold.

    Ans. I can’t go swimming today – Independent clause

    because the water is too cold – Dependent clause

     

    1. The city lights twinkled like scattered diamonds from the aeroplane window.

    Ans. The city lights twinkled -Independent clause

    like scattered diamonds – Adverbial clause

    from the aeroplane window – Adverbial phrase

     

    1. Although he knew the answer, he remained silent.

    Ans. Although he knew the answer – Dependent clause

    he remained silent – Independent clause

     

    1. She baked a delicious cake that we all ate in minutes.

    Ans. She baked a delicious cake -Independent clause

    that we all devoured in minutes -Dependent clause

     

    1. If you ever need help, just give me a call.

    Ans. If you ever need help -Dependent clause

    just give me a call -Independent clause

     

    1. They often go to Italy because they love the food.

    Ans. They often go to Italy – Main clause

    because they love the food – Subordinate clause

     

    1. He worked tirelessly until the project was finally complete.

    Ans. He worked tirelessly -Independent clause

    until the project was finally complete -Adverbial clause

     

    1. I went out on the bike that David gave me for my birthday.

    Ans. that David gave me for my birthday – Dependent clause

     

    1. The news that spread like wildfire caused widespread panic.

    Ans. The news that spread like wildfire -Noun clause

    caused widespread panic -Independent clause

     

    1. I’ll do whatever it takes to make your dream come true.

    Ans. I’ll do whatever it takes -Independent clause

     

    1. The old house, creaking in the wind, held many secrets within its walls.

    Ans. held many secrets within its walls -Independent clause

     

    1. After she finished her chores, she went out to play with her friends.

    Ans. After she finished her chores -Adverbial clause

    she went out to play with her friends -Independent clause

     

    1. Whether you win or lose, it’s important to play fair.

    Ans. Whether you win or lose -Adverbial clause

    it’s important to play fair -Independent clause

     

    1. The book, which I borrowed from the library, is filled with fascinating stories.

    Ans. which I borrowed from the library -Adjective clause

    is filled with fascinating stories -Independent clause

     

    1. He arrived just in time, as the train was about to depart.

    Ans. He arrived just in time -Independent clause

    as the train was about to depart -Adverbial clause

     

    1. The aroma of freshly baked bread filled the air, making my mouth water.

    Ans. The aroma of freshly baked bread filled the air -Independent clause

     

    1. I don’t understand why you always disagree with me.

    Ans. I don’t understand – Independent clause

    why you always disagree with me – Adverbial clause

     

    1. The birdsong that greeted me every morning was a source of joy.

    Ans. The birdsong that greeted me every morning – Noun clause

     

    1. Despite her fears, she bravely climbed the mountain peak.

    Ans. Despite her fears – Adverbial phrase

    she bravely climbed the mountain peak -Independent clause

     

    1. The children laughed with delight as they chased the butterflies in the meadow.

    Ans. as they chased the butterflies in the meadow -Adverbial clause

     

    1. If you believe in yourself, you can achieve anything you set your mind to.

    Ans. If you believe in yourself  – Dependent clause) 

    you can achieve anything you set your mind to – Independent clause

     

    1. He closed his eyes and imagined himself lying on a warm beach.

    Ans. He closed his eyes -Independent clause

     

    1. As soon as the rain stopped, we went for a walk in the park.

    Ans. As soon as the rain stopped -Adverbial clause

    we went for a walk in the park -Independent clause

     

    Pitfalls and Common Errors

    Here are some of the pitfalls and common errors to watch out for:

     

    1. Subject-verb agreement: Ensure the subject and verb in each clause agree in number (singular or plural). Mistakes often arise with collective nouns (team, family) or complex subjects.
  • Incorrect – The team are practicing hard for the championship.
  • Correct – The team is practicing hard for the championship. (one independent clause)
  1. Incomplete clauses: Ensure each clause has a subject and a verb that can convey a complete thought by itself. Fragments cannot stand alone as sentences.
  • Running to the store. (Who is running?)
  • Loves chocolate ice cream. (Who loves it?)
  • Should be finished soon. (Who or what should be finished?)

 

 

 

Exercise 2- Choose the correct clause type in the following sentences.

 

1. Give the money to whoever arrives first.
A. Adverbial Clause
B. Noun Clause
C. Adjective Clause
D. None of the above
Ans. B. Noun Clause

2. The boys are always playing.
A. Main Clause
B. Subordinate Clause
C. Adjective Clause
D. Adverbial Clause
Ans. A. Main Clause

3. She packed a backpack filled with snacks for the long journey.
A. Main Clause
B. Subordinate Clause
C. Noun Clause
D. Adjective Clause
Ans. D. Adjective Clause

4. My sister loves cold drinks.
A. Main Clause
B. Subordinate Clause
C. Adjective Clause
D. Adverbial Clause
Ans. A. Main Clause

5. A vacation is what I need most.
A. Main Clause
B. Adjective Clause
C. Noun Clause
D. None of the above
Ans. C. Noun Clause

6. I read the book.
A. Main Clause
B. Subordinate Clause
C. Adjective Clause
D. Adverbial Clause
Ans. A. Main Clause

7. Although I was nervous, I took a deep breath and gave the presentation confidently.
A. Main Clause
B. Subordinate Clause
C. Adjective Clause
D. Adverbial Clause
Ans. B. Subordinate Clause

8. Whenever the boys sleep, their teacher scolds them.
A. Main Clause
B. Subordinate Clause
C. Adverbial Clause
D. Adjective Clause
Ans. B. Subordinate Clause

9. He promised that he would call me soon, but I haven’t heard from him yet.
A. Main Clause
B. Adverbial Clause
C. Noun Clause
D. Adjective Clause
Ans. C. Noun Clause

10. The rain has stopped.
A. Main Clause
B. Subordinate Clause
C. Noun Clause
D. Adverbial Clause
Ans. A. Main Clause

11. The host told us how he escaped.
A. Main Clause
B. Adverbial Clause
C. Noun Clause
D. Adjective Clause
Ans. C. Noun Clause

12. If you don’t go, I will get angry.
A. Main Clause
B. Subordinate Clause
C. Adverbial Clause
D. Adjective Clause
Ans. B. Subordinate Clause

13. He lost his double chin after he gave up chocolate.
A. Main Clause
B. Subordinate Clause
C. Noun Clause
D. Adverbial Clause
Ans. E. Adverbial Clause

14. I will call you when I am free.
A. Main Clause
B. Subordinate Clause
C. Adverbial Clause
D. Adjective Clause
Ans. A. Main Clause

15. Please thank whoever chose to bring chocolate cake to the party
A. Main Clause
B. Adverbial Clause
C. Noun Clause
D. Adjective Clause
Ans. C. Noun Clause

16. After she graduated from college, Sandra got a job as a nurse.
A. Main Clause
B. Subordinate Clause
C. Adverbial Clause
D. Adjective Clause
Ans. C. Adverbial Clause

17. You should ask what grandma adds to her cake to make it so sweet.
A. Main Clause
B. Adverbial Clause
C. Noun Clause
D. Adverbial Clause
Ans. C. Noun Clause

18. When Johnathan left the house, he forgot his keys.
A. Main Clause
B. Subordinate Clause
C. Adverbial Clause
D. Adjective Clause
Ans. C. Adverbial Clause

19. The conductor who led the marching band was impressed with his players’ performance.
A. Main Clause
B. Noun Clause
C. Adverbial Clause
D. Adjective Clause
Ans. D. Adjective Clause

20. The man whom we had never met came over and greeted us warmly.
A. Main Clause
B. Subordinate Clause
C. Noun Clause
D. Adjective Clause
Ans. D. Adjective Clause

21. When the dog ran across the street he was almost hit by a car
A. Main Clause
B. Subordinate Clause
C. Adverbial Clause
D. Adjective Clause
Ans. B. Subordinate Clause

22. You there, who is sitting quietly at the corner, come here and lead the class out.
A. Main Clause
B. Adverbial Clause
C. Noun Clause
D. Adjective Clause
Ans. D. Adjective Clause

23. I know the man who sells this watch.
A. Main Clause
B. Subordinate Clause
C. Adverbial Clause
D. Adjective Clause
Ans. B. Subordinate Clause

24. The sun is shining today.
A. Main Clause
B. Subordinate Clause
C. Adverbial Clause
D. Adjective Clause
Ans. A. Main Clause

25. Finn is asking for the shoes which used to belong to his dad.
A. Main Clause
B. Subordinate Clause
C. Adverbial Clause
D. Adjective Clause
Ans. D. Adjective Clause

 

Exercise 3 – Write sentences as per the given directions.

 

  1. You may sit. –  Add an Adverbial Clause

Ans. You may sit wherever you like

  1. I fear. Add a Noun clause.

Ans. I fear that I shall fail. – Noun Clause

  1. I spoke to her sister.  –  Add an Adverbial Clause

Ans. As she was not there, I spoke to her sister. 

  1. Will you wait? – Add an Adverbial Clause

Ans. Will you wait till I return

  1. I do not know. -Add a Noun Clause

Ans. I do not know what he wants

  1. I think. – Add a Noun Clause

Ans. I think you have made a mistake

  1. Mary had a little lamb. – Add an Adjective Clause

Ans. Mary had a little lamb whose fleece was white as snow

  1. She never does anything. – Add an Adjective Clause

Ans. She never does anything unless her parents allow it

  1. The house belongs to my grandfather. – Add an Adjective Clause

Ans. The house that I live in belongs to my grandfather.

  1. They could not reach there in time. -Add an Adverbial Clause

Ans. Although they drove really fast, they could not reach there in time.

  1. The chess player didn’t know. -Add a Noun Clause

Ans. The chess player didn’t know if they could win.

  1. Make sure you think this through. -Add an Adverbial Clause

Ans. Before you make your decision, make sure you think this through.

  1. She told her sad story. -Add a Noun Clause

Ans. She told whoever would listen her sad story.

  1. Call me. -Add an Adverbial Clause

Ans. As soon as you meet her, call me.

  1. The company is shutting down. – Add an Adjective Clause

Ans. The company that I worked for in 2018 is shutting down.

  1. Karen needs to speak with. – Add a Noun Clause

Ans. Karen needs to speak with whoever runs the store.

  1. The girl is here to meet you.    – Add an Adjective Clause

Ans. The girl, who has shifted from Japan, is here to meet you.

  1. Danny follows a strict diet.     – Add an Adverbial Clause

Ans. Danny follows a strict diet in order to stay fit.

  1. The teacher is retired now. – Add an Adjective Clause

Ans. The teacher who taught me maths in school, is retired now.

  1. His reason for being late was. – Add a Noun Clause

Ans. His reason for being late was that his cat got sick.

  1. Make sure you buy it.   – Add an Adverbial Clause

Ans. Make sure you buy it only if you like it.

  1. Our suspect depends on.  -Add a Noun Clause

Ans. Our suspect depends on who owns the murder weapon.

  1. The computer is not working properly.  – Add an Adjective Clause

Ans. The computer that I bought last week is not working properly.

  1. Jennifer scrubbed the floor.    – Add an Adverbial Clause

Ans. Jennifer scrubbed the floor until her arms ached.

  1. I couldn’t see. -Add a Noun Clause

Ans. I couldn’t see whether it was day or night.

Conclusion

Learning about clauses is not just about ticking off a grammar box, it is about you gaining confidence in your grammatical skills and ability to communicate effectively.

By understanding how clauses work and applying them in your writing, you can express yourself with greater clarity, precision, and impact. So, keep practicing, experiment, and have fun exploring the world of clauses!

Also See :

Exercises of Tenses

Exercises on Prepositions

Exercises of Articles

Exercises of Simple Present Tense

Exercise of Adjectives

Exercise of Conjunctions

Exercise of Determiners

Exercises of Countable and Uncountable Nouns

Show More

Related Articles

यौगिक किसे कहते हैं? परिभाषा, प्रकार और विशेषताएं | Yogik Kise Kahate Hain Circuit Breaker Kya Hai Ohm ka Niyam Power Factor Kya hai Basic Electrical in Hindi Interview Questions In Hindi